Rainforest Life: Outing #9 – Day 6

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(Wednesday 10-September-2014)

@8:32am

The wind last night was just horrendously loud and strong. 50km/hour SW – according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Several times I awoke to the deafening roar caused by all the trees in this entire section of forest violently bashing, scraping and rubbing against each other.

I must say that each time I was ripped out of my sleep I had to consciously clear the paranoia of something falling on me from my head but I managed that surprisingly well: reminding myself repeatedly “If the universe wanted you dead, you already would be”, and was asleep only a few minutes later, until the next bout of wind.

No sign whatsoever of either Possum or Antechinus last night, with the food looking pretty well untouched when I opened my tent flaps a moment ago. I think the wind keeps them in their burrows/trees, and that wind is still thrashing its way through the valley in waves.

@10:22am

Having drunk the last of the water stored inside my tent with me, I grab one of the three litre bladders and one litre plastic bottle, get my shoes back on and go around back of my tent to refill them from my self-made pond. Having been woken several times last night, I figure more coffee is in order, to get me going.

Shock accompanies disgust as I look down at my beautiful little pond to find it nearly empty.

“FUCK!.. NO! My water!”

Straight away the realization kicks-in, that I’ll have to walk to refill my water today.

“Argh! FUCK!”

I shouldn’t *have* to walk *anywhere* – the rain came to me! There was at least another two days supply in the pond. That god-damn wind!

“FUCK YOU WIND!”

So I stand there – just absorbing the full disappointment of the moment, coming to terms with the chore I have ahead of me – as I watch an assortment of ants going about their everyday business on the ground below, before conceding the 7.2km round-walk is inevitable. Fuck.

Maybe I shouldn’t have chopped that leech after all?

Maybe, the forest took away my water as punishment for that stupid grub?

Pft. Even if that were true – that natures karmic forces caused retribution by emptying my pond – I’d still rather chop leeches heads off then have to walk to refill my bladders, than let the little creeps suck my blood just for a bit of effort-free H²O.

I’m making the world a better place; one mutilated leech at a time.

@2:46pm

I’ve taken the two 3ltr bladders and one of the 1ltr plastic bottles, walked halfway across the forest and returned with 7ltrs of ice-cold creek water. I feel better now it’s done, though it wasn’t a bad walk anyway. Stopped and munched on any Geebung in my path too, so I’ve had my greens for the day.

Having been rained-in the first two-three days – especially with your own private water catchment right outside your tent – you find the notion of having to *go* somewhere just for water, an obnoxious thought. Well maybe you wouldn’t, but I certainly do.

But, once I’d strapped-up and clipped everything in place and started moving, it was pretty nice.

Walking all the way there, refilling my water bladders and walking back I didn’t hear or see a living soul – which made it even better – although I must say I had a sneaking suspicion I was being watched as I walked out of my camp.

While I was at the creek I took a moment to guzzle-down almost a full litre of water – to save my drinking from the seven litres now in my bag – and man, was it nice.

So cold, it hurt the back of my throat just the same way ice-water from a refrigerator would do.

I stopped using any form of water purification weeks ago now by the way, because I just don’t need it.

Why deliberately contaminate beautiful, fresh, clean, rainforest water with chlorine tablets just because I *think* there *might* be contaminants in there?

On what planet does that make any sense at all?

Both in town at camping stores and online there’s an awful lot of talk about pre-cleaning everything you drink, just *in case* there may be some kind of pollutant, virus or bacteria in the water. “Better safe than sorry” is the general consensus, and camping outlets drive the message further, with warnings about Diarrhea, Guardia and other *HORRIBLE* water-born illnesses lurking in our waterways just *WAITING* to ooze-out and infect hapless campers and hikers.

To those camping stores and online manufacturers spreading such unnecessary fear I say “Go and fuck yourselves”. Anything to sell a product.

I’ve been out here all winter, and haven’t used any kind of water treatments since outing six: Not once have I felt the slightest tinge of off-coloured illness creep over me. Not even a simple bout of “the runs”. I drink straight from the creek, and I’m just hunky.

If you’re in India or some other third-world, rancid, toilet-bowl of a country then sure: Use water treatment. But here, save yourself the money, drink water that’s both clear and running, and you’ll be just fine.

@5:06pm

Super windy again tonight. *scary* strong wind. Just about to do the usual boring pasta dinner, with the last of the parmesan cheese, before settling-in to read short stories for the night.

Edit: Indecently, the two beastly, eighty-meter-tall trees in todays photos are just two of an army of goliath-scale Turpentine and Bluegum specimens; tower over all the upstart thirty-meter trees, they d

Rainforest Life: Outing #9 – Day 6
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Jason
Animal-loving cleaner with a parrot.

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